Trinity Leeds: ‘The UK’s most digitally advanced shopping destination.’ really?

So far the only major mall to launch in Western Europe this year, Trinity Leeds had its first day of business yesterday. Set to be the UK’s most digitally advanced shopping destination, we had to see if it lived up to its hype.

The ‘all-digital experience’ includes a new website with an embedded CRM system, Google Product Search, mobile app (download here), digital screens, free Wi-Fi and a service team equipped with iPads.

Trinity Leeds

A NEW LEVEL OF PERSONALISATION

Google Product Search: The power of Google at Trinity Leeds was highly anticipated as they pushed Product Search. Google Shopper allows consumers to search for a specific item to see which retailers in the centre sell that product; they also offer price checking functionality and the opportunity to Click and Collect. However, the big build-up was let down by limited references around the mall.

Also, the product search doesn’t currently check availability, which is its most significant drawback. It’s not difficult to see a brand’s click and real-time store feed also pushing to the mall app and website to give real-time stock availability. 

App: it was launched the morning of the opening for iPhone. Many already felt that it was a missed opportunity. Whilst it had reasonable usability, we can’t help but think it could have been so much more.

WHAT COULD HAVE BEEN DONE BETTER?
  • Push mobile marketing using localisation to increase personalisation
  • Map functionality currently very basic
  • Yet to launch Android app

appa

Download here.

DIGITAL SCREENS

Four digital video walls in the mall allowed shoppers to interact through gesture recognition, taking their photos and animating them in a series of themes. Advertising screens were also spotted around the mall and linked to retailer websites and promotions.

HOW DID RETAILERS EMBRACE MULTICHANNEL?

Sadly, we were left disappointed and felt that retailers missed a trick. This was a perfect opportunity to put real weight behind the digital side of their offering. Other than reminders of social platforms featuring in occasional store windows, there was little else that pushed social or anything truly innovative.

WHO DID IT WELL?

Topshop reminded shoppers to get online at every opportunity, positioning themselves as Topshop.com. Extreme promotion of social platforms, free Wi-Fi and clearly signed Collection Points for Google Shoppers’ Click and Collect took place throughout the store.

TOPS

TOPS2

Dorothy Perkins, while lacking much social platform promotion and innovation, did highlight their Click and Collect function in-store.

DP

Digital screens in the windows of Marks & Spencer and Warehouse

WAREHOUSE

WHAT COULD HAVE BEEN DONE BETTER?

– Incorporated digital screens in-store including workstations which could be used for consumers to learn more about the brand, browse and order anything in-store, show promotional videos or further product information.

– Personalised and localised offers through social media.

– QR code readers todirect shoppers from posters and product tags to transactional mobile sites, social platform pages, links to discounts, reviews or instructional videos and demonstrations such as catwalk and close-ups.

AN ALL-DIGITAL EXPERIENCE?

Leeds Trinity had the opportunity to create a truly impressive digital experience, but instead it left us feeling deflated. The lack of promotion around the shopping centre and in-store meant that the ‘UK’s most digitally advanced shopping destination’ could easily go unnoticed. As for positioning themselves as a modern shopping experience, connecting consumers and retailers, they’re not quite there yet. We’re hoping that there is more to come…